Aaron Klotz at Mozilla

My adventures as a member of Mozilla’s Platform Integration Team

New Team, New Project

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In February of this year I switched teams: After 3+ years on Mozilla’s Performance Team, and after having the word “performance” in my job description in some form or another for several years prior to that, I decided that it was time for me to move on to new challenges. Fortunately the Platform org was willing to have me set up shop under the (e10s|sandboxing|platform integration) umbrella.

I am pretty excited about this new role!

My first project is to sort out the accessibility situation under Windows e10s. This started back at Mozlando last December. A number of engineers from across the Platform org, plus me, got together to brainstorm. Not too long after we had all returned home, I ended up making a suggestion on an email thread that has evolved into the core concept that I am currently attempting. As is typical at Mozilla, no deed goes unpunished, so I have been asked to flesh out my ideas. An overview of this plan is available on the wiki.

My hope is that I’ll be able to deliver a working, “version 0.9” type of demo in time for our London all-hands at the end of Q2. Hopefully we will be able to deliver on that!

Some Additional Notes

I am using this section of the blog post to make some additional notes. I don’t feel that these ideas are strong enough to commit to a wiki yet, but I do want them to be publicly available.

Once concern that our colleagues at NVAccess have identified is that the current COM interfaces are too chatty; this is a major reason why screen readers frequently inject libraries into the Firefox address space. If we serve our content a11y objects as remote COM objects, there is concern that performance would suffer. This concern is not due to latency, but rather due to frequency of calls; one function call does not provide sufficient information to the a11y client. As a result, multiple round trips are required to fetch all of the information that is required for a particular DOM node.

My gut feeling about this is that this is probably a legitimate concern, however we cannot make good decisions without quantifying the performance. My plan going forward is to proceed with a naïve implementation of COM remoting to start, followed by work on reducing round trips as necessary.

Smart Proxies

One idea that was discussed is the idea of the content process speculatively sending information to the chrome process that might be needed in the future. For example, if we have an IAccessible, we can expect that multiple properties will be queried off that interface. A smart proxy could ship that data across the RPC channel during marshaling so that querying that additional information does not require additional round trips.

COM makes this possible using “handler marshaling.” I have dug up some information about how to do this and am posting it here for posterity:

House of COM, May 1999 Microsoft Systems Journal;
Implementing and Activating a Handler with Extra Data Supplied by Server on MSDN;
Wicked Code, August 2000 MSDN Magazine. This is not available on the MSDN Magazine website but I have an archived copy on CD-ROM.

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